Find Businesses and Services in Cornwall, England

Cornwall is a beautiful and multi-faceted county: Though it is only about 70 miles long and under 50 miles across at its widest point, it has the longest and, perhaps, most varied coastline of any English county. Dark, high cliffs punctuated by wide sandy beaches in the North give way in the South to wide flooded tree-lined river valleys. The interior has just as much variety. From atmospheric moorland haunted by the iron-age relics that touch the skyline to picturesque villages in deep wooded valleys, Cornwall has it all. North Cornwall's picturesque market town - and one-time capital of the county - Launceston is often missed by visitors heading west on the A30, and that's a great pity as the town has much to recommend it. With it's own Norman Castle, a thriving music scene and a genuine Cornish ambience about the town. At the other end of the county, Penwith is as far west as you can get without getting on a boat. On its North Coast, you will find wild moors, tiny villages and stunning seascapes. Eerie monoliths and stone circles populate moors with strange sounding names like Woon Gumpus Common and Carn Kenidjack. The quality of light that Cornwall is famed for is here - the same light that has drawn artists to St Ives and Newlyn since the turn of the twentieth century and also inspired the construction of the Tate Gallery in 1993. Even if you have no interest in art, the Tate, St Ives is a stunning modern building inside and out. The magnificent Minack Theatre. On the South Coast, Penzance serves as market town for the whole area. Nearby, at Marazion, the impressive island of St Michael's Mount is moored a few hundred yards offshore, though you can reach it by causeway at low tide. Also of note is The Minack Theatre, an auditorium on a cliff with evening performances throughout the summer. The Perranporth area on the North Coast is often overlooked in favour of the bright lights of nearby Newquay, which is a pity as the area - often known as Poldark Country after the books by Winston Graham (and the 1970s TV series) has plenty to offer. Perranporth has some of the best surf on the North Coast, while St.Agnes, a small and picturesque town and also a surfer's haunt of some note - has plenty to recommend it away from the beach. Cornwall's South Coast is rightly famous for its beautiful wooded valleys, rivers and beaches, the Roseland Peninsula is an example. This slim finger of land lies south of Truro and to the East of Falmouth.

Advertisements

Featured Businesses

Featured Businesses

Do you have, or know of, a company or business that operates in Cornwall?

Click here to register and add the company!

Advertisements